Crash And Burn And Open-Ended Series

By Cynthia Sax on February 23, 2016

Today, I’m visiting EverydayFangirl, talking about open ended series

https://everydayfangirl.wordpress.com/2016/02/23/guest-post-cyborgs-and-writing-an-open-ended-series-with-cynthia-sax/

Here’s a snippet…

Series can also be closed (the writer knows exactly how many stories will be in the series) or open-ended (the writer doesn’t know how many stories will be in a series).

Crash And Burn, my most recent release, is the latest installment in my open-ended cyborg series. Reading buddies ask me how many stories I plan to write in the series and I have no idea. Each story is crafted to be read on its own.

***

Subscribe To My Release Day Newsletter: http://tasteofcyn.com/2014/05/28/newsletter/

Crash And Burn

Crash was manufactured to be one of the best warriors in the universe. The cyborg has spent many human lifespans fighting the enemy. But, unlike his battle-loving brethren, he doesn’t enjoy killing. When he escapes the Humanoid Alliance, he vows to never end another life.

Then he meets Safyre, an infuriating human female, and he considers breaking his vow.

Safyre will do anything to save her friend, the being she loves like a sister. She’ll ravish a huge hunky cyborg, kiss his best friend, and invoke scorching hot desires the male never realized he could feel. Dark soulful eyes, a quick wit, and a tempestuous passion won’t divert her from her mission.

Love, and a planet-destroying weapon, however, might stop her permanently.

Order Now:

On Amazon US: http://www.amazon.com/Crash-Burn-Cyborg-Sizzle-Book-ebook/dp/B019EBKIF2

On Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Crash-Burn-Cyborg-Sizzle-Book-ebook-x/dp/B019EBKIF2/

On ARe: https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-crashandburn-1950244-147.html

On B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/crash-and-burn-cynthia-sax/1123141101

On Kobo: https://store.kobobooks.com/en-ca/ebook/crash-and-burn-13

Topics: Guest Post | No Comments »

Talking Crash And Burn And Building A Series

By Cynthia Sax on February 23, 2016

I’m talking about one way to write a standalone series today on Liza O’Connor ‘s online home.

http://multiuniversesoflizao.blogspot.ca/2016/02/cyborg-brethen-building-series-with.html

Here’s a snippet…

There are a number of ways to build a standalone series (a series with books that can be read on their own). My favorite, by far, is the sexy brother premise.

This is exactly what it sounds like. The hero of the first book in the series has two or three or four or more sexy, single brothers. In the subsequent books, these brothers find their own heroines (or heroes or heroines and heroes, depending on the stories being told – grins).

These brothers don’t have to be brothers by birth.

***

Subscribe To My Release Day Newsletter: http://tasteofcyn.com/2014/05/28/newsletter/

Crash And Burn

Crash was manufactured to be one of the best warriors in the universe. The cyborg has spent many human lifespans fighting the enemy. But, unlike his battle-loving brethren, he doesn’t enjoy killing. When he escapes the Humanoid Alliance, he vows to never end another life.

Then he meets Safyre, an infuriating human female, and he considers breaking his vow.

Safyre will do anything to save her friend, the being she loves like a sister. She’ll ravish a huge hunky cyborg, kiss his best friend, and invoke scorching hot desires the male never realized he could feel. Dark soulful eyes, a quick wit, and a tempestuous passion won’t divert her from her mission.

Love, and a planet-destroying weapon, however, might stop her permanently.

Pre-order Now:

On Amazon US: http://www.amazon.com/Crash-Burn-Cyborg-Sizzle-Book-ebook/dp/B019EBKIF2

On Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Crash-Burn-Cyborg-Sizzle-Book-ebook-x/dp/B019EBKIF2/

On ARe: https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-crashandburn-1950244-147.html

On B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/crash-and-burn-cynthia-sax/1123141101

On Kobo: https://store.kobobooks.com/en-ca/ebook/crash-and-burn-13

Topics: Guest Post | No Comments »

Writing Erotic Romance – Prologues

By Cynthia Sax on August 10, 2015

I wrote a 3,000 word, 12 page prologue for Breathing Vapor, the follow up story to Releasing Rage (Breathing Vapor will release in November).

Mira, my heroine, acts like a major beyotch when she’s around other beings. She has a great reason for acting this way but I was worried that if you didn’t know this reason when you first met her, you might find her an unsympathetic heroine (i.e. you’d hate her guts).

So I wrote a prologue, sharing a scene from her past that showed why she was that way. It was powerful. It made me, as a writer, cry.

It was also unnecessary. My awesome editor convinced me I didn’t need it, that I’d created a character readers would love without knowing the backstory. I took it out and you know what? It’s a much stronger story without the prologue.

I’ve written many prologues. Not one has survived the editing process. Why? Because usually a prologue isn’t required (usually! There are always exceptions to every rule, including this one, but those exceptions are rare.).


Why Editors (and Readers) Hate Prologues

A prologue is set at an earlier time and often a different place than the core story. Every time writers change settings, we jar the reader out of the story. Jarring the reader out of the story between the prologue and chapter one is a HUGE risk. The reader hasn’t yet become emotionally invested in the story.

Especially since the first pages are a prologue. The reader bought the story expecting the hero or heroine portrayed in the back cover copy. In Releasing Rage, readers want to meet a tormented, angry hero. They don’t want to read about Rage when he had a kinder, gentler view of the worlds. It is kind of like seeing a guy’s baby photos on a first date. It’s much too soon for that.

Prologues are also backstory dumps. Backstory is powerful. Readers often read for it (in the case of E.L. James’ Grey, they’ll buy an entire book to read a character’s backstory). That’s why they turn the pages. “This hero is completed fucked up. I have to know why.” We can only use a juicy piece of backstory once. Do we really want to use it at the beginning of a story, before the reader cares about the character?

Alternatives To Prologues

A great writer once told me that ideally backstory should be threaded into a story as the reader needs to know it (threaded, not dumped – again, you don’t want to draw readers out of the story). That timing often makes it more powerful.

In romance, this revelation is often easy to do because a heroine, loving a fucked up hero, for example, will eventually want to know WHY he’s fucked up. The reader can discover this at the same time.

If both of the characters already know the backstory, it is a bit more challenging. If the past truly haunts the character, he or she will likely dream about it. An incident might also trigger a memory. In Breathing Vapor, the heroine sees someone and, at first, thinks that person is a person from her past. The character might be facing the same decision they faced in the past. Will he or she make the same choice?

There are thousands of great ways to reveal backstory. If you’re stuck, reread beloved stories and note how those authors handle it. (Or email me and we can brainstorm!)

How did I handle the unsympathetic heroine in Breathing Vapor?

Mira acts like a beyotch when she’s around other beings. The solution? I show her true nature when she’s alone (actually, she’s caring for a cyborg baby but he can’t tell anyone about her kindness so she feels she’s safe).

Yes, the solution was ridiculously simple. I threaded the rest of the information throughout the core story and eliminated the prologue entirely.

How have you eliminated prologues in your own manuscripts?

***

Subscribe To My Release Day Newsletter: http://tasteofcyn.com/2014/05/28/newsletter/

Half Man. Half Machine. All Hers.

Rage, the Humanoid Alliance’s most primitive cyborg, has two goals—kill all of the humans on his battle station and escape to the Homeland. The warrior has seen the darkness in others and in himself. He believes that’s all he’s been programmed to experience.
Until he meets Joan.

Joan, the battle station’s first female engineer, has one goal—survive long enough to help the big sexy cyborg plotting to kill her. Rage might not trust her but he wants her. She sees the passion in his eyes, the caring in his battle-worn hands, the gruff emotion in his voice.

When Joan survives the unthinkable, Rage’s priorities are tested. Is there enough room in this cyborg’s heart for both love and revenge?

Buy Now:
On Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Releasing-Rage-Cyborg-Sizzle-Book-ebook/dp/B00ZOL1DRO

On ARe: https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-releasingrage-1850041-340.html

On B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/releasing-rage-cynthia-sax/1122455646

Topics: Writing Tips | No Comments »

Writing Erotic Romance – Why Do You Write Erotic Romance?

By Cynthia Sax on January 22, 2015

In my humble opinion, this is THE most important question any writer can ask herself. The second most important question, which we’ll also cover in this post, is ‘Why do you want your stories published?’ These questions are very different and they might have different answers, yet they’ll craft your career, directing you toward YOUR personal definition of success.

Note: The answers to these questions will likely change over time. The reason I’m sending my stories to publishers today is not the same reason I sent my stories to be published two years ago.

Why Do You Write Erotic Romance?

There are many, MANY answers to this question. None of them are wrong or right, better or worse. Agents or publishers or fellow writers don’t need to know your answer. This is YOUR truth.
Here are merely a few of the possibilities

– writing helps you sort out your thoughts or emotions
– you need to see your fantasies in print to fully enjoy them
– it’s fun, an outlet for your creativity
– writing fictional stories reveals real life issues you might be grappling with
– you’re writing erotic romances you can’t find in Romanceland
– you read an erotic romance, didn’t like the ending, so you’re changing it
– you see writing as a possible career or a way to become wealthy
– writing gives you a task to complete while you’re home, caring for your kids
– you want to enter your bookstore and see your name on a book cover
– your mom thinks you should write a book
– you were dared by a buddy to write an erotic romance
– you’ve always written. It is part of you
– writing is a way to vent your emotions
– you love the craft of writing, the manipulation of words
– it’s a way to use the research you love collecting
– your hubby is stationed overseas and loves receiving hot stories from you
– you see writing as a way to become famous

For a long time, I didn’t write for anyone else. I wrote only for myself, simply for the joy of putting my fantasies on paper (I’m a visual person. I have to see something to fully enjoy it). I didn’t need to be published or edited or see my story in a bookstore to be happy… so I didn’t do these things.

I still write primarily for myself. Yes, writing is now my career but I know if I ever agree to write a story I’m not excited about, I’ll be unhappy. I would rather not be published than write a story I’m not thrilled about. Some writers would call that unprofessional and unrealistic. (shrugs) Maybe it is but it’s my truth. It is what I need to be happy.

Just because you’re a writer doesn’t mean you need to be published writer. Ever. Being a published writer doesn’t automatically increase every writer’s joy of writing. For example: If you write to sort out your thoughts or feelings, you might not want anyone else to read your stories. Showing these innermost thoughts to others could erase all of your joy of writing.

Why Do You Want Your Stories Published?

Before you self-publish your first story or send it to an agent or publisher, ask yourself WHY you’re doing this. Again, there are no right or wrong answers.

Here are some possible answers

– working with an editor will improve your writing skills
– you want to widen the diversity of erotic romances in Romanceland
– you need the possible income/it is a way to possibly become wealthy
– you want to enter your bookstore and see your name on a book cover
– your mom wants to show your book to her friends
– you have a message in your stories that you wish to share with the world
– you wish to give back to Romanceland, to contribute to the industry
– you want to introduce yourself as a published writer
– you’re curious as to whether or not your story is good and want a professional’s opinion
– you want to be famous

Your answer to this question changes your options. If you want to see your story in a bookstore, you would only submit your story to publishers that have presences in bookstores. If you need income ASAP, you might look at publishers with short publishing lead times or publishers offering advances. If you want to see your name on a cover of a book, you likely wouldn’t use a pen name. If you want to become famous, you might promote your books by attending conferences or hosting book signings.

Are there some possible answers that I haven’t listed? (I’m certain there are zillions I’ve missed)

***

Subscribe To My Release Day Newsletter: http://tasteofcyn.com/2014/05/28/newsletter/

Bee Carter has been offered everything she has ever dreamed of—a caring, lasting relationship with a handsome, often charming billionaire; the permanent home she’s never had but has always craved; and wealth to buy the designer fashions she loves, support her hard-working mother, and ensure her acceptance by Chicago’s elite.

To obtain what she’s desired for so long, she has to do only two things: Walk away from her best friend, a woman who is destined to betray her … and end her passionate nightly encounters with a certain tattooed biker, a former Marine who can never give her what she needs.

Her answer should be clear, but the heart has a way of complicating even the most straightforward decisions.

Buy Links:

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Sinful-Rewards-Billionaires-Bikers-Novella-ebook/dp/B00JZOVYQG

ARe: https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-sinfulrewards7-1718231-237.html

Avon: http://www.avonromance.com/book/cynthia-sax-sinful-rewards-7

Barnes And Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/sinful-rewards-7-cynthia-sax/1119919841

Google: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Cynthia_Sax_Sinful_Rewards_7?id=CGsOBAAAQBAJ

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/sinful-rewards-7/id870582006

Topics: Writing Tips | No Comments »

Writing Erotic Romance – Finding (and Keeping) The Perfect Critique Partner

By Cynthia Sax on January 15, 2015

This post has adult content. If you are under the age of eighteen years old and/or sensitive to adult language/situations, please do not read this post.

It doesn’t matter how many years you’ve been writing, how many stories you’ve published or how many awards you’ve won. Your story isn’t perfect.

(If someone says your story is perfect, she’s blowing smoke up your tight ass or is afraid of hurting you or, the opposite, doesn’t give a shit about you or perhaps all of the above. Thank her for her kind words and look for another critique partner or editor.)

Yet-to-be published writers have two choices.
We can send our rough stories out and hope the crazy busy editor/agent we’ve contacted recognizes these diamonds in the rough and works with us through multiple revisions
OR
we can send these rough stories to critique partners (or paid editors) and make them the best they can be first and THEN send out these polished diamonds.

I always make my stories the best they can be first. Unless asked, there’s no resubmitting the same story to agents/editors. (They track this shit so don’t bother being tricksy.) We only have one shot at this and I’d like my shot to be as good as I can make it.

Critique Partners Or Paid Editors

I’ve had very few critique partners in my writing life. Why? Because in a critique partner relationship, manuscripts are exchanged. I’ll read and critique your story. You’ll read and critique mine.

When I was writing professionally part time, I had very little time. I could earn more money working additional hours at my non-writing job than I would spend hiring a freelance editor or paying for a critique. So I opted to go that route. Freelance editor vs critique partner doesn’t make much of a difference to the process. IMHO it merely changes what is being exchanged.

How To Find Perspective Critique Partners (Happy Hour)

One of the best ways to find perspective critique partners is to attend a writing workshop (either in person or online). We know that everyone paying for this workshop is interested in a) improving as writers and b) whichever topic is being covered. I especially love workshops in my specific genre. Angela Knight’s How To Write Sex workshop is a goldmine for finding erotic romance writing critique partners, as are many of the workshops offered by Passionate Ink.

Having critique partners with backgrounds in our genres is AWESOME. I don’t read or write inspirational romance. For me to give feedback on an inspirational romance is waste of everyone’s time. I don’t know the reader expectations. I wouldn’t know a good inspirational romance if it bit me on my ass.

However, I do know contemporary/SciFi/Paranormal erotic romance. Ask me to critique one of these stories and I can add value.

There are also often calls on RWA (Romance Writers of America) loops and other writer hangouts (forums, blogs, loops) for perspective critique partners.

Evaluating Perspective Critique Partners (Dating)

I say perspective critique partners because I’d never ask a complete stranger, someone I knew nothing about, to critique my manuscripts, trusting him or her with my hopes and dreams, with my writing career.

I like to virtually hang out with possible critique partners first, have a discussion, find out their personality types, their pet peeves, their strengths and weakness, hell, their genre.

Here are some questions to ask perspective critique partners…

1) Which genre do you write? Do you read in this genre? Do you LIKE this genre?

As I mentioned, every genre has expectations. Asking me, as an erotic romance writer, to evaluate an inspirational romance is useless. My critique will do more damage than good.

Does this mean that critique partners in different genres can’t work? Of course not. This is writing. I’ve seen every type of relationship work. Simply keep in mind that your genre might have different expectations.

2) What are your writing strengths? What are your writing weaknesses?

When I’m asked to critique a yet-to-be-published manuscript, I always ask what I’m critiquing. If the writer says ‘everything’, I decline because I’m not an expert in ‘everything.’ No writer is. We all have our strengths. If you don’t know your critique partner’s strength, you shouldn’t be asking them to critique your manuscript.

Preferably your critique partner’s strength should be your weakness. I’m terrible at grammar. One of my buddies is the grammar queen. I send critical manuscripts to her. In exchange, I look at her WTF (what the fuck) moments, her plot holes and emotion gaps.


3) How many stories a year do you write? How many words are these stories?

A critique partner relationship is an exchange. If I write 50,000 fresh words a month and you write 10,000 fresh words a month, you’ll spend much more time critiquing my work than I spend critiquing yours. If you’re okay with that, fine, but this is good to know at the beginning of the relationship.

4) How do you like to receive your critiques?
When I receive revisions, I read them, cry, get very, very angry, eat too much Nutella (just joking – there’s no such thing as too much Nutella), and then, the next day, I’ll incorporate them into my manuscripts. I could never receive a verbal critique. My reaction would scare the shit out of those critique partners (and editors). I need to receive critiques by email so I have time to move through this emotional process.

Some of my buddies are the opposite. They don’t learn from a critique until they hear it out loud. They need more of a back and forth on the critique that might be easier done in person or over the phone. Do whatever works for BOTH of you!

Note: Critiques are supposed to hurt like a son-of-a-bitch. If they don’t, either the critique isn’t thorough enough or you’ve developed the much-needed rhino skin or you’re on your third bottle of vodka and wouldn’t feel a transport truck if it ran over your feet.

5) What is your expected turnaround time on critiques?
If you have a family, a non-writing job, and other responsibilities, you might not be able to turnaround a critique in a day or two or three. Again, this is about setting and then meeting expectations. That’s the core of any solid relationship.

6) What do you expect from this relationship?
I usually don’t ask anyone for a critique unless I like her. However, I also don’t have a lot of extra time to chat so I tend to be mostly business. Some writers like chattier critique partners. They want to go for coffee, talk about their kids, etc. and that’s fine, as long as everyone is okay with this type of relationship.


Rejecting Potential Critique Partners (It’s Not You. It’s Me.)

If I get any strange vibes from potential critique partners, if they’re not a fit for me or if they’re unable to give me what I want from the relationship, I don’t waste anyone’s time. I walk away. Romanceland is very small so I’m polite. I simply say something like “I don’t think I’m the type of critique partner you need.”

Many (usually) newer writers are concerned about critique partners stealing premises or story ideas. A story is copyrighted as soon as it is written BUT lawsuit hassles can be avoided by teaming with critique partners we trust. There are plenty of writers looking for critique partners. Don’t team with anyone you don’t feel comfortable with.

First Exchange (The Trial Marriage)

After you decide you’re potentially compatible, consider exchanging a scene or two to test the waters. Before this happens, I usually share with editors and critique partners how I learn. Theory doesn’t mean anything to me. I like it when critique partners give me examples of how they would rewrite sentences. Examples drive some other writers crazy. They prefer the theory.

A good critique partner or editor usually won’t give writers solutions. They’ll point out problems, and perhaps, as I mentioned, give an example or two of how we might fix it. It is the writers’ responsibility to derive the solutions that are right for OUR stories.

Do we have to address every ‘problem’ critique partners point out? No, of course not. No critique partner is perfect. We’re all juggling multiple responsibilities. But we should keep in mind that if one reader (and all writers are readers first) has a problem with the scene or character or whatever, other readers (including agents and editors) might also.

And we should be polite. Critique partners are taking valuable time out of their lives to try to help us. They are doing this because they sincerely want our manuscripts to be stronger.

Evolving Relationships (Marriage)

Relationships change. This is true for critique partnerships also. You might have to amend or possibly dissolve the relationship. Communicate. Be as honest as you can yet polite and professional. If it isn’t working for you, make suggestions for improvement. If there’s no hope of resolution, shake hands and go your separate ways.

Learn from dysfunctional relationships but never talk smack about critique partners, not now, not ever. This is a trusted relationship. They trust you with their hopes and dreams. You trust them with yours. Maintain this trust.

What are some of your tips for finding and keeping awesome critique partners?

***

Subscribe To My Release Day Newsletter: http://tasteofcyn.com/2014/05/28/newsletter/

Bee Carter has been offered everything she has ever dreamed of—a caring, lasting relationship with a handsome, often charming billionaire; the permanent home she’s never had but has always craved; and wealth to buy the designer fashions she loves, support her hard-working mother, and ensure her acceptance by Chicago’s elite.

To obtain what she’s desired for so long, she has to do only two things: Walk away from her best friend, a woman who is destined to betray her … and end her passionate nightly encounters with a certain tattooed biker, a former Marine who can never give her what she needs.

Her answer should be clear, but the heart has a way of complicating even the most straightforward decisions.

Buy Links:

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Sinful-Rewards-Billionaires-Bikers-Novella-ebook/dp/B00JZOVYQG

Avon: http://www.avonromance.com/book/cynthia-sax-sinful-rewards-7

Barnes And Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/sinful-rewards-7-cynthia-sax/1119919841

Google: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Cynthia_Sax_Sinful_Rewards_7?id=CGsOBAAAQBAJ

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/sinful-rewards-7/id870582006

Topics: Writing Tips | 1 Comment »

Writing Erotic Romance – Pacing

By Cynthia Sax on January 8, 2015

This post has adult content. If you are under the age of eighteen years old and/or sensitive to adult language/situations, please do not read this post.

All of the installments of Sinful Rewards are roughly the same number of words. Why then do some readers and reviewers claim the installments are becoming shorter?

The answer is one word—pacing.

Pacing is the speed of reading or comprehension. Pacing in writing is very similar to the tempo in music. This is why many writers write to music. They match the tempo. One scene might be a slow song, the sentences long and luxurious, the action leisurely. Another scene might have a dance beat, the sentences short, the action rushed. These two scenes might have the same number of words but the arrangement is very different, tricking the brain into reading faster or slower, as the writer intends.

And the writer should intend. Pacing is one of the most powerful tools in our toolbox. It decides whether or not readers finish our stories, what they grasp, what they overlook. It is how I can hide clues in my stories without readers perceiving them as obvious. For erotic romances, it is the difference between a fast and furious against the wall quickie and a Sunday morning sexual exploration.


The Natural Flow Of A Story

A story usually starts slower, speeds up in the middle, and then slows down at the end. The reason for this is because action and dialogue is faster to read than narrative and description.

At the beginning of a story, we normally describe the characters and the setting and weave in back story. All of these have a slower pace.

At the end of the story, the characters often think back on what they’ve learned, how they’ve grown. The action is winding down and the characters are absorbing what this means for them, giving readers a glimpse into the future.

The middle of the story is normally dialogue and action heavy. Both of these are fast to read. As Sinful Rewards is a serial, one continuous story, the installments in the middle naturally have a fast pace.


The Reader Breathes As Our Characters Breathe

To draw readers into our stories, we want to eliminate as much separation between them and our point of view character as possible. One method to have the reading pace reflect our point of view character’s pace. If our character is in a life or death car chase, her adrenaline pumping, her breath ragged, our reader should be reading as fast as she can. If our character is lying on the beach, relaxing, our reader should be relaxing also, leisurely turning pages.

A faster pace isn’t always better, especially for erotic romances. If the entire story is go-go-go, the reader won’t be able to breathe, won’t reflect on events, might become tired. A fast paced sex scene can be an exciting fast fuck but it isn’t romantic or lovey dovey. Having one pace for the entire story also reduces the power of this tool.


Pacing Problems

When I’m told by an editor, an agent, or a critique partner, that I have pacing problems, my first temptation is to change what happens in the scene, to crank up (or down) the action, if it is a battle scene, to increase (or decrease) the body count.

That is often not necessary. I can write the same scene with a fast pace or with a slow pace merely by changing my choice of words or my sentence structure.


Size Matters

The size of words and the length of sentences influence pacing. Readers read two short sentences faster than they read one long sentence. They read two one syllable words faster than they read one two syllable word.

Short simple sentences are easier for our brains to understand. If I really want a reader to note a point in my story, I use a short simple sentence. “I love you” is one example. This sentence is three words long. The words are one syllable each.

However, a short simple sentence is also read quickly. As “I love you” is usually a critical declaration, I will often frame it with long, complex sentences to slow down the moment, to allow the reader to savor it.

“I love you,” he declared. And he did, madly, truly, intensely, feeling an endless depth of emotion he never thought possible.

This second, run-on sentence serves the first, encouraging the reader to linger over the words, the sentiment.


Not So Fast, Mister

Forget what your English teacher taught you. In erotic romances, run-one sentences are our friends. They slow down sex scenes, increasing the emotion, bringing the reader along for the sizzling hot ride.

Using description in a sex scene is an easy way to slow pacing. The heroine doesn’t simply press her lips to the hero’s shoulder. She notes the salty taste of his skin, his musky scent, the way his muscles flex under her. She’s intensely aware of him, of everything about the man she’s fucking.

Sneaking in some introspective will also slow down the scene. The hero is rocking into her, moving in and out, in and out, and she’s thinking how easy it would be to fall in love with him, to crave a lifetime of this loving. But, oh noes, she knows they’re not meant to be. They only have this one sextastic moment and she’ll make every second count. (See how we inserted some delicious conflict? Grins. Yes, we’re tricksy that way.)

We don’t want to have a slow pace for the entire sex scene. The pace of the scene should reflect the pace of the act, starting slow, increasing faster and faster, until oh my God, the pacing climaxes when the characters come. Then the pace gradually slows as rational thought returns.

Pacing is a powerful tool, one that I am always working to perfect, taking courses, dissecting well written or best selling stories.

How do you control pacing?

***

Subscribe To My Release Day Newsletter: http://tasteofcyn.com/2014/05/28/newsletter/

Bee Carter has been offered everything she has ever dreamed of—a caring, lasting relationship with a handsome, often charming billionaire; the permanent home she’s never had but has always craved; and wealth to buy the designer fashions she loves, support her hard-working mother, and ensure her acceptance by Chicago’s elite.

To obtain what she’s desired for so long, she has to do only two things: Walk away from her best friend, a woman who is destined to betray her … and end her passionate nightly encounters with a certain tattooed biker, a former Marine who can never give her what she needs.

Her answer should be clear, but the heart has a way of complicating even the most straightforward decisions.

Buy Links:

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Sinful-Rewards-Billionaires-Bikers-Novella-ebook/dp/B00JZOVYQG

Avon: http://www.avonromance.com/book/cynthia-sax-sinful-rewards-7

Barnes And Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/sinful-rewards-7-cynthia-sax/1119919841

Google: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Cynthia_Sax_Sinful_Rewards_7?id=CGsOBAAAQBAJ

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/sinful-rewards-7/id870582006

Topics: Writing Tips | No Comments »

Writing Erotic Romance – Analyzing Scenes Part 2

By Cynthia Sax on January 2, 2015

This post has adult content. If you are under the age of eighteen years old and/or sensitive to adult language/situations, please do not read this post.

Last week, I analyzed a scene, showing you what I wished to accomplish with each line. That scene was the first meet between Bee and Nicolas, our billionaire hero. This week, I’ll be doing the same thing with the first meet between Bee and Hawke, our bad boy biker hero.

Once again, I’ll be using a scene from Sinful Rewards 1 ( http://www.amazon.com/Sinful-Rewards-Billionaires-Bikers-Novella-ebook/dp/B00I7V89H0 ).

***

“You’re a hot mess, aren’t you?” He bends over and retrieves the wayward tube. <-- Bee is a neat freak. She HATES messes. That Hawke calls her a hot mess is significant. It shows her that she can be sexy even if she’s imperfect. This paragraph also shows readers that Hawke is a take action type of guy. He picks up the tube because she needs it back. He doesn’t wait to be asked.

“I’m not normally a mess.” I stuff my brush, wallet, passcard, and, oh my God, my emergency tampon back into my purse. My hands tremble. “The strap broke and—”<-- Hawke has seen Bee at her worst. He’s seen her emergency tampon, for goodness sakes! Notice how Bee focuses on ‘mess’ and completely ignores the ‘hot’ part of Hawke’s comment. She can’t put the two side by side in her mind.

“You have black ink all over your pretty white shirt.” He skims the unopened tube of lipstick down my cotton-covered side, leaving a trail of sweet sensation. My nipples tighten and my spine arches, my body instinctually responding to his touch.<-- Hawke tells Bee exactly how it is. He doesn’t ignore the black ink or try to be polite. He’s unrelentingly honest. He takes the opportunity to touch her. She reacts physically, almost primitively.

“Give me that.” I snatch the lipstick from him, unnerved by my reaction, and I glance down at my blouse. “Oh, God.” Black ink is smudged over the fabric. “You’re right.” My heart sinks. Has it been there all day? Since I doctored my purse this morning? Nicolas, my boss, everyone must have seen it, and no one said anything, no one except my badass biker. “I am a mess.” My voice wobbles.<-- Bee was rigidly polite with Nicolas, showing him what she thought he wanted to see. She’s honest and open to the point of rudeness with Hawke. She cusses. She shows her emotions. That Hawke is the only one who pointed out the ink stain is significant also. She can trust him to tell the truth. Notice also that she says ‘MY badass biker.’ She has already claimed Hawke as her own, giving him some of her loyalty.

“You’re a hot mess,” he corrects. “There’s a big difference between the two.” His eyes are a faded blue, matching his jeans. “Let me see your purse.” He holds out one large hand. Calluses and scars mar his skin.<-- First, Hawke notices that his comment made Bee feel bad and he immediately addresses this. As we saw in the scene with Nicolas, Bee does the same thing. Second, Bee LOVES it when outfits coordinate. This is why she notes that Hawke’s eyes match his jeans. He naturally coordinates. Third, Hawke takes action once more, asking for her purse. Fourth, Hawke isn’t perfect. His skin is callused and scarred. Bee believes perfection is necessary for love.

I eye his palm with suspicion. “Why do you want to see it?”<-- Bee is a cautious woman. She doesn’t trust or change her plans quickly.

“I need to use your brush,” he jokes. “Why do you think?” I think he’s full of shit. His brown hair is buzzed close to his head. There’s nothing for him to brush. “I’ll fix the strap for you. There’ll be less of it.” His gaze drifts down my body, his perusal more stimulating than any touch. “But then there’s less of you.”<-- Hawke jokes and she knows he’s joking. He’s a fellow fixer. He looks at her, which Bee, our exhibitionist heroine, equates to caring.

“There’s the perfect amount of me.” I put my free hand on my hip. “I’m average height.”<-- Again, Bee uses the word ‘perfect.’ She feels perfection is necessary for love. She puts her hand on her hip which would draw his gaze there. Bee is in denial about her height. She doesn’t want to be viewed as ‘less than.’

“You are average height. . .for a munchkin.” The tattooed stranger stares unabashed at my chest. My taut nipples press against the cotton, begging for his attention. “A shapely, sexy—”<-- Hawke calls her on her lies. He’ll do this throughout the story, forcing her to be honest with herself. He calls her a munchkin which has cute connotations. Again, he looks at her and she wants even more attention.

“You’re one wrong word away from a slap across the face.” I glare at him.<-- This is an open, honest reaction. Bee says whatever pops into her head, her words uncensored. Notice how her threat is a physical one, as though she’s looking for an excuse to touch him.

If you liked this post, you might like
Writing Erotic Romance – Balancing Sex And Plot
or
Writing Erotic Romance – Making Every Sex Scene Different
or
Writing Erotic Romance – Making Sex Sexy
or
Writing Erotic Romance – The Basics Of A Sex Scene
or
Writing Erotic Romance – Word Choice

***

Subscribe To My Release Day Newsletter: http://tasteofcyn.com/2014/05/28/newsletter/

Sinful Rewards 1

Cynthia Sax

Belinda “Bee” Carter is a good girl; at least, that’s what she tells herself. And a good girl deserves a nice guy—just like the gorgeous and moody billionaire Nicolas Rainer. He is everything she wants in a man.

Or so she thinks, until she takes a look through her telescope and sees a naked, tattooed man on the balcony across the courtyard. Hawke is mysterious, the bad boy she knows will bring only heartbreak. He has been watching her, and that makes him all the more enticing.

But when a mysterious and anonymous text message dares her to do something bad, she must decide if she is really the good girl she has always claimed to be, or if she’s willing to risk everything for her secret fantasy of being watched.

Is her mystery man the reclusive billionaire with a wild side or the darkly dangerous bad boy?

Buy Links:
Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Sinful-Rewards-1-Cynthia-Sax-ebook/dp/B00I7V89H0

ARe: https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-sinfulrewards1-1560586-237.html

Barnes And Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/sinful-rewards-1-cynthia-sax/1119055390

Google: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Cynthia_Sax_Sinful_Rewards_1?id=g08ZAwAAQBAJ

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/sinful-rewards-1/id814148703?mt=11

Topics: Writing Tips | No Comments »

Writing Erotic Romance – Analyzing Scenes Part 1

By Cynthia Sax on December 26, 2014

This post has adult content. If you are under the age of eighteen years old and/or sensitive to adult language/situations, please do not read this post.

Since many of us are on holiday over these next two weeks, I thought I’d take a break from the learning heavy Writing Erotic Romance posts and illustrate how some of these tips can be put into action.

I’ll use scenes from Sinful Rewards 1 ( http://www.amazon.com/Sinful-Rewards-Billionaires-Bikers-Novella-ebook/dp/B00I7V89H0 ). This isn’t because I think they are brilliantly written. As with most writers, I look at my own writing and see room for improvement. I’m using my scenes because I know what I was thinking and trying to do when I wrote them.

***

At exactly ten minutes after five, a sleek black limousine rolls to a stop in front of me. The door opens and a man barks, “Get in.” <-- Nicolas told Bee he’d arrive at EXACTLY this time. Bee believes she wants a reliable, constant man. Nicolas is definitely reliable. He does what he says he’ll do. This arriving exactly when he says he’ll arrive happens throughout all 12 installments. It is small quirk that makes him different. The limousine also tells readers that this is a man who doesn’t drive himself. Why doesn’t he drive himself? In Nicolas’s case, he’s a very busy man. He prefers to spend every minute he can working.

The urge to give him the finger is intense, but I obey because there’s no mistaking that irate tone. The man works for Nicolas, my husband-to-be.<-- Bee has backbone but she is more concerned about appearances than her pride. That she refers to him as her husband-to-be tells us that she is already thinking marriage at this first meet. She has crazy high expectations that I doubt any man could have met.

I settle back into the comfy leather seat, meet the man’s gaze, and suck in my breath. Correction. The man is Nicolas. <-- Bee likes luxury. She likes nice things. She notes the leather seat before she notes the man across from her.

He sprawls across from me, his arms and legs stretched out, his dark brown eyes glinting with intelligence. He’s well dressed, the craftsmanship of his suit even more impressive up close. He’s handsome, his countenance kissed by the gods.<-- The first thing she notices is the intelligence in his eyes. THEN she notices his clothes. If Bee was a true fashionista and completely fixated on appearances, she would have noticed his clothes first. That she notices an inner quality (his intelligence) hints that maybe she’s not as shallow as she acts. She also uses ‘kissed’ which is a passionate and physical description.

And unfortunately he’s a bit of an ass. <-- Nicolas might be her ideal man but Bee isn’t blind to his faults and she expects him to ‘woo’ her. She won’t make this easy for him.

As soon as this disloyal thought crosses my mind, I smother it with excuses. He’s had a bad day. He’s a busy man. He doesn’t know me. Once he realizes what type of a woman I am, how perfect we are for each other, he’ll treat me as I should be treated. <-- Again, Bee has her pride. She won’t be with a man simply because he’s handsome and has money. She’s also loyal and is trying her damnedest to remain loyal to Nicolas.

“This wasn’t supposed to cost me any additional time,” Nicolas grumbles, his gorgeous face twisted into a very ugly scowl. “That wasn’t the plan.”<-- THIS is key. Nicolas had a plan. That plan wasn’t to meet with Bee. What was the plan? Readers don’t find out until Sinful Rewards 7. Bee also always has plans, for her life, for her career, for her relationships. This hints that the two of them have things in common.

“What plan was that, Mr. Rainer?” I ask, not brave enough to call him by his first name. Once I uncover the problem, I can fix it and fix us. Then our relationship will be back on track and my world will right itself. <-- Bee loves to fix things. When she’s faced with a problem, she derives a solution. This is important because her relationship with Nicolas and her relationship with Hawke both have problems. She also doesn’t allow problems to fester. She addresses situations immediately.

Nicolas ignores my question. His gaze sweeps over me, pausing on my purse. I wiggle, acutely aware of its embarrassingly ragged condition. “Do you have my phone?” He gets straight to the point.<-- In the previous paragraph, we learned that Bee likes to address problems immediately. Nicolas’ response is to ignore her, to avoid talking about problems. This conflict will shape their entire relationship. When Nicolas looks at her ragged purse, Bee feels he’s judging her. In previous scenes, we’ve learned that Bee has been judged harshly in the past. That Nicolas judges her makes him ‘dangerous.’

“Yes, I have your phone.” I hide my frustration under a polite smile. This isn’t how this meeting played out in my fantasies. There are no expressions of eternal gratitude or undying love. Nicolas appears grumpy, as though I inconvenienced him by finding his phone. <-- Again, Bee had a plan. She plotted out in her mind how the entire meeting would unfold. The meeting isn’t going to plan and Nicolas isn’t the man she thought he was. Her wording (eternal and undying) is also important. Bee likes relationships that last.

I dig through my purse and hand the device to him. His fingers brush over mine, his hands soft and cool. He’s a vampire, minus the sparkles. My smile spreads, my heart lightening. And it’s daylight hours. This explains his foul mood and the tinted windows.<-- Vampires live forever. They never die, never ‘leave’. Bee is also justifying Nicolas’s bad behavior, stubbornly trying to remain loyal to him.

Nicolas slides the phone into his inside jacket pocket. His form is firm and lean. He’s not all bulging muscle as the tattooed stranger is, but he’s fit. <-- Bee is sitting across from her dream man and she’s thinking about a stranger she’s seen once, a man who represents everything she’s trying to avoid.

If you liked this post, you might like
Writing Erotic Romance – Balancing Sex And Plot
or
Writing Erotic Romance – Making Every Sex Scene Different
or
Writing Erotic Romance – Making Sex Sexy
or
Writing Erotic Romance – The Basics Of A Sex Scene
or
Writing Erotic Romance – Word Choice

***

Subscribe To My Release Day Newsletter: http://tasteofcyn.com/2014/05/28/newsletter/

Sinful Rewards 1

Cynthia Sax

Belinda “Bee” Carter is a good girl; at least, that’s what she tells herself. And a good girl deserves a nice guy—just like the gorgeous and moody billionaire Nicolas Rainer. He is everything she wants in a man.

Or so she thinks, until she takes a look through her telescope and sees a naked, tattooed man on the balcony across the courtyard. Hawke is mysterious, the bad boy she knows will bring only heartbreak. He has been watching her, and that makes him all the more enticing.

But when a mysterious and anonymous text message dares her to do something bad, she must decide if she is really the good girl she has always claimed to be, or if she’s willing to risk everything for her secret fantasy of being watched.

Is her mystery man the reclusive billionaire with a wild side or the darkly dangerous bad boy?

Buy Links:
Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Sinful-Rewards-1-Cynthia-Sax-ebook/dp/B00I7V89H0

ARe: https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-sinfulrewards1-1560586-237.html

Barnes And Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/sinful-rewards-1-cynthia-sax/1119055390

Google: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Cynthia_Sax_Sinful_Rewards_1?id=g08ZAwAAQBAJ

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/sinful-rewards-1/id814148703?mt=11

Topics: Writing Tips | No Comments »

Writing Erotic Romance – Christmas And Other Holidays

By Cynthia Sax on December 18, 2014

This post has adult content. If you are under the age of eighteen years old and/or sensitive to adult language/situations, please do not read this post.

Writers work on a fucked up schedule. Right now, I’m writing a story I hope will be released in August 2015. The story is set in the summer. I have the heat cranked in my writing cave and am listening to the Beach Boys. Many of the Christmas stories that are releasing this week were written in July (of this or the previous year).

What this means is…

We, writers, celebrate Christmas twice–once when we write a Christmas story and again when this story is released.

Note: I’ll be focusing on Christmas for this post but many of my insights can be used for other holidays. Christmas is the biggest holiday theme in erotic romance. Valentine’s Day themed stories are usually a tough sell. I’m not quite sure why.

Reasons To Write A Christmas Erotic Romance

One of the reasons Christmas stories are popular in the print world is because, traditionally, friends and family members give readers print books as presents. Print books can be wrapped and placed under trees or in stocking. A Christmas theme signals to loved ones that the book is likely a recent release. The reader might not already have it.

In the eBook world (and erotic romance sales are mostly eBook), the sales bump occurs after Christmas. Readers have received gift cards for presents and are looking for stories for themselves. They are less likely to purchase Christmas stories because…well…Christmas is over. This is one of the downsides of Christmas stories. They don’t normally sell during the rest of the year. There’s a two month window for sales (November and December) and that’s it.

However, some eBook only writers craft Christmas stories to take advantage of promotional opportunities. Maybe they want to have a story to feature on themed days or parties. Or their publishers might be promoting a Christmas themed series.

Plus Christmas stories are often light and fun, making readers happy. I certainly enjoy writing them.



Celebrate The Season Right

Do writers have to celebrate Christmas to write a Christmas erotic romance? Of course not. I’ve never had a ménage with two hunky well-hung aliens and I’ve written hot, steamy stories on that subject. Researching and writing a Christmas story is easy peasy by comparison.

BUT (and yes, this is a big but – insert ass joke here – grins) we should understand why readers read and love Christmas erotic romances.

Normally, Christmas erotic romances are even more hopeful and positive than non-Christmas erotic romances. There are some common erotic fantasies (having sex with Santa Claus, being on the naughty list, receiving a hot naked man for Christmas). Meshing a childhood memory with a very adult fantasy jacks up the naughtiness level.

Most Christmas erotic romances don’t touch the religious aspect of the holiday. I’m not saying it can’t be done (there are no rules in writing) but be cautious about this and know that you might offend readers.


Anti-Christmas Stories

Some readers hate Christmas. A few of my writing buddies have published anti-Christmas stories, thinking to appeal to these readers. These aren’t Scrooge stories (which is another popular theme in erotic romance – even the grumpiest Scrooge can be won over by three or four mind blowing orgasms). The characters don’t discover the Christmas spirit (between the sheets). These stories are truly anti-Christmas.

Unfortunately, my friends’ stories didn’t sell well. Why? The issue with anti-Christmas stories is that readers who hate Christmas don’t want ANYTHING to do with Christmas. They don’t want to read about characters hating Christmas. They don’t want their stories to mention Christmas at all.

There’s also a marketing challenge. At Christmas themed events, all of the readers love Christmas. Where is the anti-Christmas readership?

Again, I’m not saying your anti-Christmas erotic romance won’t be hugely successful. It simply has some sales challenges.


Setting The Mood For Christmas In July

When I wrote my Christmas stories, I listened to Christmas music all month long. Yep, I was listening to Deck The Halls in July. It drove my hubby bonkers. Some of my writing buddies decorate their writing caves. They might crank up the air conditioning or bake gingerbread cookies.

Do whatever puts you in the Christmas mood. You’ll look crazy but hey, you’re a writer. Everyone already assumes you’re nuts.

Do you have any tips for writing/publishing holiday erotic romances?

If you liked this post, you might like
Writing Erotic Romance – Balancing Sex And Plot
or
Writing Erotic Romance – Making Every Sex Scene Different
or
Writing Erotic Romance – Making Sex Sexy
or
Writing Erotic Romance – The Basics Of A Sex Scene
or
Writing Erotic Romance – Word Choice

***

Subscribe To My Release Day Newsletter: http://tasteofcyn.com/2014/05/28/newsletter/

Nicolas Rainer, Chicago’s most sought-after billionaire bachelor, has finally decided what he wants, and that’s Bee Carter in his arms, forever. He shows up unannounced on her doorstep and kisses her until her toes curl and her body burns.

Nicolas wasn’t the sexy man Bee expected to see this morning. Hawke Masters, her tattooed former marine, is riding his customized chopper toward the condo building, anticipating an equally mind-meltingly erotic encounter.

Both men want her with a thrilling intensity. Neither her billionaire nor her biker wishes to share her affections. Is today the day Bee is forced to choose?

Buy Links:

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Sinful-Rewards-Billionaires-Bikers-Novella-ebook/dp/B00IMHU7FG

ARe: https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-sinfulrewards5-1663924-237.html

Avon: http://www.avonromance.com/book/cynthia-sax-sinful-rewards-5

Barnes And Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/sinful-rewards-5-cynthia-sax/1119919838

Google: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Cynthia_Sax_Sinful_Rewards_5?id=nFaYAwAAQBAJ

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/sinful-rewards-5/id828414457

Topics: Writing Tips | No Comments »

Writing Erotic Romance – Creating Interesting Secondary Characters

By Cynthia Sax on December 11, 2014

This post has adult content. If you are under the age of eighteen years old and/or sensitive to adult language/situations, please do not read this post.

With Sinful Rewards 6 releasing next week (Cyndi, Bee’s bubbly best friend, returns to Chicago in this installment), I thought we’d talk about creating interesting secondary characters.

Erotic romances focus on the romantic couple (or more). And they should. They’re romances. But our hero and heroine (or hero and hero, or hero, hero and heroine, or whatever type of erotic romance you’re writing) usually live in a world with other beings. They usually have parents, might have siblings, bosses, best friends, co-workers, baddies, etc. (I say usually because there’s only one rule in romance and that is a romantic happy ever after or romantic happy for now.)


Rule #1 For Secondary Character
s

When a secondary character walks onto the page (Helloooo, ladies!), he or she naturally distracts the reader simply by being his/her fine self, drawing the reader’s attention away from the heroine and hero. Danger, Will Robinson! (Yes, I’m having a wayback playback SciFi moment) We want readers to remain focused on the main characters, to give a shit about our couple (or more).

How do we minimize the damage?

The secondary character’s appearance must change something for the hero or heroine. She or he could push the plot forward or show/change the hero/heroine’s character or give them insights or fuck up/otherwise influence the romantic relationship. Supporting the hero/heroine’s story is the secondary character’s sole reason for existence.


Three Times The Charm

Every new character also distracts the reader. She must keep track of all of these names and identities (Hint: If you need a glossary of characters at the beginning of your story, you have too many). I’m as guilty as any writer is about having my cast of thousands. After the fast first draft, I list all of my characters, noting how many times they appear in the story. I ask myself “Can an existing character play this same role?”

My magic number is three. If a secondary character appears in at least three separate scenes, I feel her existence is justified. Her life is spared.

Another reason for consolidating characters is that the more page time a character has, the more the reader cares (this could be love or hate) about the character. We want readers to be emotionally invested in all of our characters, including our secondary characters.

I then ask myself if this secondary character could do more in these existing scenes. Could she not only push the plot forward but also show readers another aspect of the heroine? Could she display a twist on the main theme? For example: Could Cyndi, Bee’s best friend, interpret loyalty differently?

There are no lazy bitches in my stories.


Your Secondary Character’s Hopes and Dreams

Fully developed characters, even secondary characters are more interesting. (and no, we’re not talking about breast sizes) At the minimum, we should know their goals, motivations and conflicts. What do they want? Why do they do what they do? Why does Cyndi, Bee’s best friend, need a roommate? Why does she live in Nicolas’s building? Why does she work at the candy manufacturing plant? Why is she Bee’s best friend? Why does she have blonde hair?

(I’ll write a post in the future about best friends. They’re a special type of secondary character. i.e. If you fuck them up, readers will hate your heroine/hero forever.)

Again, in a tightly crafted story, many of these answers tie back to the heroine or hero.

For example: Cyndi has blonde hair because blonde hair is often viewed as being more attractive to men. Bee wants people to watch her but when she’s with Cyndi, she isn’t usually noticed.

I also wanted them not to be competitors. A man (like Nicolas or Hawke) who is attracted to the brunette Bee is less likely to be attracted to the blonde Cyndi.

And it was important that Cyndi has enough admirers that she won’t be tempted to pursue Nicolas or Hawke. It would have been a very different story if Cyndi had been interested in the same men. Bee, being loyal and non-aggressive, likely would have stepped aside. (Yes, I can see Sinful Rewards readers thinking about the dynamic between Nicolas and Hawke. – grins – I deliberately cast them with a contrasting dynamic to Bee and Cyndi)

In your story, EVERYTHING counts.


When Secondary Characters Take Over

If you’ve crafted a full, vibrant secondary character, you’ll likely face another problem. The secondary character will turn diva and wish to take over, to dominate the story, to twist it into a tale about him or her.

When that happens, I remember the first rule of secondary characters. Supporting the hero/heroine’s story is the secondary character’s sole reason for existence.

If the focus is on the secondary character, I rewrite the scene, bitch slapping this upstart until she/he behaves. If the scene isn’t about the hero/heroine at all, I cut it, saving it for this secondary character’s own story (and if you craft an interesting character, readers WILL ask you to write his/her story – so don’t call, for example, a male secondary character in an erotic romance Flopsy – http://www.amazon.com/Godrabbit-Protect-Serve-Cynthia-Sax-ebook/dp/B006YFO18C ).


Romance Subplots

But-but-but the secondary character has his/her own romance. His/her romance is a romance subplot.

Tough shit. In a tightly crafted story, any subplot, including a romance between secondary characters, is about the hero/heroine also.

Maybe the heroine sees her best friend fall in love with a guy she’s known forever and then doubts her love at first sight with the hero.

Maybe the heroine sees the best friend’s ho hum, boring romance and wants something different. Then she feels like a freak for wanting this something different.

Is this difficult? Of course. But no one said writing was easy.


How do you create interesting secondary characters?

If you liked this post, you might like
Writing Erotic Romance – Balancing Sex And Plot
or
Writing Erotic Romance – Making Every Sex Scene Different
or
Writing Erotic Romance – Making Sex Sexy
or
Writing Erotic Romance – The Basics Of A Sex Scene
or
Writing Erotic Romance – Word Choice

***

Subscribe To My Release Day Newsletter: http://tasteofcyn.com/2014/05/28/newsletter/

Nicolas Rainer, Chicago’s most sought-after billionaire bachelor, has finally decided what he wants, and that’s Bee Carter in his arms, forever. He shows up unannounced on her doorstep and kisses her until her toes curl and her body burns.

Nicolas wasn’t the sexy man Bee expected to see this morning. Hawke Masters, her tattooed former marine, is riding his customized chopper toward the condo building, anticipating an equally mind-meltingly erotic encounter.

Both men want her with a thrilling intensity. Neither her billionaire nor her biker wishes to share her affections. Is today the day Bee is forced to choose?

Buy Links:

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Sinful-Rewards-Billionaires-Bikers-Novella-ebook/dp/B00IMHU7FG

ARe: https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-sinfulrewards5-1663924-237.html

Avon: http://www.avonromance.com/book/cynthia-sax-sinful-rewards-5

Barnes And Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/sinful-rewards-5-cynthia-sax/1119919838

Google: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Cynthia_Sax_Sinful_Rewards_5?id=nFaYAwAAQBAJ

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/sinful-rewards-5/id828414457

Topics: Writing Tips | No Comments »

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